Monday, June 8, 2015

7 Entrepreneur Mistakes To Avoid In Early Meetings

adult-first-impression Relationships are the key to survival and success for entrepreneurs, and first impressions usually turn into lasting impressions. As an advisor to many early-stage entrepreneurs, I caution them to always be prepared for that chance meeting with a famous investor, a potential partner or an industry guru. It’s not smart to believe that your passion and gift of gab will impress anyone.

Advance homework and preparation is key to every good first impression. With smart people, you can’t bluff your way past tough questions, and talking more and louder about your dreams won’t fill the gap of relevant content. Despite the fact that you can’t predict the circumstances of every first meeting, there are many faux pas that you can avoid, including the following:

  1. Failure to recognize an important person before introduction. Every entrepreneur should build a “cheat sheet” of 10 key individuals they hope to encounter at any given meeting or networking opportunity. The impact of responding first with facial recognition from LinkedIn or Facebook is huge compared to possible alternatives.

  2. Start talking immediately about your project and background. Asking questions and listening will leave a greater first impression more often than talking. Even more impressive are targeted questions that indicate you already have done your homework on their current role, expertise and company affiliations.

  3. Quick to name-drop common friends and business links. A mention or introduction from a shared friend will always give you an advantage. But be cautious about dropping names of people who may not really know you, or whose recollection of you may not be so positive. The investors I know are quick to do some real due diligence.

  4. Ask a thousand questions, with no apparent objective. To make a memorable first impression, you need to make your objective clear in simple and non-emotional terms, before the other party has to ask or guess. Think of it as not wasting the other person’s time, and always positioning the next step, like asking for a meeting or a partnership.

  5. Flaunt how much you know about every subject. It’s important to do your homework and appear knowledgeable on relevant subjects, but a good impression will turn bad if you interrupt every answer with a correction, or can’t stop talking about any given subject. Good initial conversations should never be turned into debates or political platforms.

  6. Easily distracted by a friend or someone more important. We all hate being dumped quickly in a business or personal situation for someone more attractive or important. Smart entrepreneurs learn how to smile and maintain eye contact, make transitions positively and proactively follow-up to solidify their impact, rather than lose it.

  7. Dress to make a statement or stand out in the crowd. Appropriate dress is all in the eye of the beholder, so that should be your criteria. If you are presenting to a group of angel investors, assume business attire or match the norm of members. Washed-out jeans may be your norm at work, but won’t impress most long-time business executives.

With a little forethought and business sense, all these mistakes can be turned into opportunities for you to be remembered. All it takes is the same diligence that every entrepreneur puts into solution development, their business plan and investor presentation. You shouldn’t be surprised to learn that first impressions usually last longer than any documents you prepare.

Psychologists say it only takes three to five seconds for someone to form a lasting first impression. Either consciously or unconsciously, people important to your future will make quick judgments about your professionalism, character and trustworthiness quickly.

Don’t jeopardize the future of your startup, and your chosen lifestyle, by assuming you can wing it. Only preparation will keep you and your image from flying astray.

Marty Zwilling

*** First published on Entrepreneur.com on 5/29/2015 ***

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